Pilobolus – Amazing and fun shadow dance troupe on the Conan O’ Brian show.

Pilobolus takes creative dancing to another level. Here is a clip from Conan where they use shadows to trick your mind..

Pilobolus began as an experiment among three guys and one puzzled professor in a Dartmouth dance class back in 1970. It was survival of the giddiest, as the three non-dancers goofed around with the material they’d been given — themselves — and got entangled in science-inspired poses (think: “soft-belly protoplasmic thing”) and movements. From these humble, biological beginnings has emerged an innovative, unlikely and almost-uncategorizable dance company that combines athleticism, grace and humor with a profound sense of unity. Their smooth, organic choreography — featuring unusual partnering and lifts — often blurs the lines between individual performers, creating a sense of dance-troupe-as-organism. Still evolving after 35 years, Pilobolus has built up a repertoire of more than 85 works and received numerous awards, including the Samuel H. Scripps American Dance Festival Award for lifetime achievement in choreography. Their hilarious appearance at the 2007 Oscars — where they built witty silhouettes to punctuate the ceremony — brought the troupe further into the public eye.



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