LOTR’s Rivendell Recreated with 200,000 LEGO Bricks


Back in August we brought you the incredible LEGO recreation of the Lord of the Ring’s Helm’s Deep Battle that took Rich-K and Big J, 150,000 LEGO bricks to build. Now, it’s time to show you another recreation inspire by J.R.R. Tolkien’s epic saga. Master LEGO builders Alice Finch and David Frank have teamed up to make the Elven outpost in Middle-earth, Rivendell, using an astonishing 200,000 LEGO bricks. Notice the gorgeous colors, the detail in the architecture and all the miniature scenes within a scene.

The Brothers Brick has a great interview with the two about building the sprawling set. In it, they talk about all the research they had to do before they even laid one brick and how they had to approach the project from a design standpoint. When The Brothers Brick asked, “What did you struggle with the most?,” we learn an interesting fact.

“Because the landscape and vegetation are so important to the model, I came up with the idea of having it transition through the seasons,” Alice states. “We now have so many different leaf colors to choose from that I thought it would be great to be able to use them all, and having it flow gradually from spring on the left to autumn on the right would be an interesting way to highlight the variety of foliage colors.”











via [The Brothers Brick]



January 20, 2017

Floating Cabin Lets Nature-Lovers Sleep in the Treetops of Sweden

If you’ve ever dreamed of cuddling up in a contemporary treehouse, the 7th Room Treehotel may be your new favorite getaway. Designed by Snøhetta—a design office that dabbles in landscaping, architecture, interiors, and brand design—the floating bungalow is tucked away in Northern Sweden and perfectly positioned for a sweeping view of the Northern Lights. The 7th Room is elevated by twelve 10-meter stilts and is beautifully built around the towering trunk of a pine tree.

Read Article


January 20, 2017

19 Most Creative Water Fountains From Around the World

Water fountains have a long place in our history. Dating back to the Ancient Roman times, these reservoirs were first designed with a purely practical purpose—for holding precious drinking water and bathing. These early fountains were uncovered, free standing, and placed along the street for public consumption. (Wealthier folks also had them in their homes.)

Read Article


Get Our Weekly Newsletter