Back to the Future – Part 2

Lea B 1980 & 2011 Paris
Irina Werning is back with a Part Two of her incredibly awesome series Back to the Future. The Buenos Aires-born photographer impressively captures the same tone and essence of old photos in her recreations. She even included other countries this time and it will continue to do so. Her next installment will feature Istanbul, Baghdad, Beirut, Iceland and Cairo.

The series stands as an excellent indicator of how we age and conjures up some funny memories that are associated with it. Some of these poses are cute as a child but look comical and even strange when adults try and reenact them.


Fer 1981 & 2011 Buenos Aires


Sole 1988 & 2011 Buenos Aires


Patrick 1986 & 2011 Paris

Alexandra 1970 & 2011 Paris


Carli 1990 & 2011 Buenos Aires


Johannes 1994 & 2011 Hambourg


Christoph 1990 & 2011 Berlin Wall


Andy 1964 & 2011 Los Angeles


Giorgio 1982 & 2011 Paris


Diego 1970 & 2011 Buenos Aires


Sonia and Laurita 1998 & 2011 Buenos


The Zurbanos 1999 & 2011 Buenos Aires

Irina Werning’s website





December 2, 2016

Sexy French Farmers Pose for Shirtless 2017 Calendar

Last year, the holiday season was set ablaze by France’s Pompiers Sans Frontières (Firefighters Without Borders) and their sizzling, stripped-down calendar. Shot for a good cause by renowned Paris-based fashion photographer Fred Goudon, the risqué calendar proved to be a popular Christmas gift—both in France and abroad. In keeping with tradition, Goudon has photographed a new crop of au naturel pin-up models for his 2018 edition: French farmers.

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December 1, 2016

Meticulous Landscape Paintings Beautifully Represent Intangible Emotional States

Artist Crystal Liu intimately ties her emotional states to beautiful abstract paintings. In large-scale works, she constructs landscapes that are metaphors for the intangible forces that drive us. Visually, elements of the Earth and sky are the actors for the feelings we cannot easily imagine. Together, the sun, mountains, and more depict “narratives of conflict, entrapment, longing, and precarious hope.” These symbols allow Liu to seem removed, yet make the pieces deeply personal.

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