Before and After Shots of Joggers

Last summer, Sacha Goldberger decided he would take on a very interesting project. He assembled a team who helped him create an outdoor studio at Bois de Boulogne, a park located near Paris that’s 2 1/2 times the size of New York’s Central Park. He stopped joggers, asking them for a favor – would they sprint for him and then pose right after for his camera? Many obliged. Out of breath, these joggers showed an overwhelming amount of fatigue on their faces.Goldberger then asked these same people to come into his professional studio exactly one week later. Using the same light, he asked them to pose the same way they had before.

“I wanted to show the difference between our natural and brute side versus how we represent ourselves to society,” Goldberger tells us. “The difference was very surprising.”





















Kind of reminds you of Judy Starkman’s series, The Secret Life of Swimmers, doesn’t it?

Don’t forget to check out Goldberger’s other creative sets – Grandma’s Superhero Therapy, 70 Years Separates Them and Tiny People Invade Fashion Photography.

Finally, a big thanks to Sacha for allowing us to debut this very intriguing series here, at My Modern Met, first. We’re huge fans of your work.

Sacha Goldberger’s website



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