Provocative Shadow Art Created Through Suspended Doll Parts


Unity is a suspended installation by Korean artist Bohyun Yoon that takes fragmented pieces of dolls and transforms them into a line of people in suggestive poses. The numerous dismembered silicon rubber parts float abstractly in midair, hanging on their own strands of string, but reveal an entirely different image once light is cast directly on them. The shadow art produced from Yoon’s methodically placed spotlight exposes the compromising positions hidden within the carefully composed parts. The artist says, “I cut, I extend, I distort, I reconstruct, and I fragment the body to create a chaotic image of a human.”

Currently based in Richmond, Virginia, the artist has resided in several locations which have each attributed to the development of his art, which is clearly inspired by the human body. He says, “By living in Korea, Japan and the U.S, I have first-hand experience in diverse social systems and have come to view my life experiences as raw material for my research. With my research in mind, my art utilizes the body as the tool for an intensive investigation of the public and private; examining the relationship between how people understand their body and how this understanding represents themselves in the greater context.”



Bohyun Yoon website
via [Gaks]



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