Spectacular Inception-Like Cityscapes by Brad Sloan


Oregon-based photographer Brad Sloan fell in love with Manhattan’s urbanscape on a 3-day trip to New York City and managed to capture some spectacular shots of the Big Apple in that short amount of time. Sloan, who modestly refers to photography as his hobby, turns oft-photographed streets and landmarks into incredible images of architecture that seem like surreal, continuous skylines straight out of the film Inception.

The angular, reflective, and soaring architecture alone offers a sense of the city, but Sloan’s artistic renderings present something beyond the norm. The photographer’s cleverly manipulated, monochromatic images translate both the enormity of the structures as well as an inexplicably eye-catching geometric pattern. The skyscrapers are both mirror images of one another and seemingly unique entities separated by a thin stream of skylight. In some cases, there isn’t even a separation, but rather a continuous path of buildings populating the frame.










Brad Sloan on Flickr
Brad Sloan blog
via [Artchipel]





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