Live Ants Create "Sculpture" Tunnels in New Plexiglass Art

In this “live” new piece of art by artist Brad Troemel, worker ants take center stage as they’re seen creating tunnels through multi-colored gel. The gel provides the ants with all of the necessary nutrients, so it’s up to the ants to complete their daily tasks. This includes biting into the gel, chewing it and packing smaller bits into larger spheres, carrying gel chunks to the surface and storing their refuse into designated piles. Most of the gel is excavated and organized.

The artwork consists of nine clear plexiglass cartridges that hang from the ceiling. Since these are all clear, viewers can watch the ants scurry around as they perform their daily tasks. They can even see these ants build the “sculpture” tunnels themselves.

Part science, part art, it’s a mesmerizing piece of work that gives you an inside look at ant farms.

The artist himself learned a few things. “Some people say ants build tunnels aimlessly, but those people haven't watched ants for as long as I have. Ants tend to tunnel from the furthest ends of their homes downwards, eventually connecting all eight corners. I found the ants stopped digging as productively when placed in larger, 30" x 22" homes.” Read more about his experiment, here.

You can see this work in person at Tomorrow Gallery from now through November 9. You can always watch a short Vine video clip by the Two Percent, here.



Tomorrow Gallery website

via [The Two Percent]



January 15, 2017

Timeless Photos Capture the Dreamy Villages of Cinque Terre

The Cinque Terre, a string of rustic coastal villages along Italy’s Ligurian Coast has long been an inspiration for travel photographers. With plunging cliffs and dramatic vistas, the small towns are ripe for postcard perfect photography. But when Slovenian photographer Jaka Bulc traveled to the Cinque Terre, he immersed himself in a different side of the towns. The result is a set of timeless images that peel back the layers of the well-loved vacation spot.

Read Article


January 14, 2017

Portraits of Legendary Musicians Painted on Vinyl Records

For years, Arizona-based artist Daniel Edlen has created show-stopping works of vinyl art. Inventively using records as his canvas, Edlen has redefined “album art” with his painted portraits of iconic singers and beloved bands. To create each masterpiece, Edlen applies acrylic paint directly onto the record’s vinyl. Stark, black-and-white tones enable each singer’s portrait to dramatically pop from its black background, and delicate, dappled brushstrokes reminiscent of pointillism emphasize the surface’s unique contours.

Read Article


Get Our Weekly Newsletter