BREAKING: iPhone 3G S Unveiled!


Apple’s unveiled a new iPhone today, the iPhone 3G S — the “s” stands for speed. Although it looks almost exactly like the 3G, it’s much, much faster — some tasks are almost four times faster. Data speeds are upped to 7.2Mbps HSDPA, and the camera is now a 3 megapixel unit with tap-to-autofocus and auto white balance — and just as expected, it now supports 30fps VGA video recording with editing features. You’re also getting a built-in compass, Nike+ support, and a new battery that offers 5 hours of 3G talk time and 9 hours of WiFi internet use.

There are some surprises, too — holding down the home button now enables a new voice control interface that lets you do everything from make calls to control iTunes, and Apple’s touting a new “fingerprint-resistant oleophobic coating.”

New and end-of-contract pricing is set at $199 for 16GB and $299 for 32GB when it goes on sale June 18th Stateside and in 80 more countries in August — and the current 8GB 3G will remain on sale for $99, effective immediately. You’ll have to pay a bit more if you’re mid-contract, though — $299 for the 3G and $399/$499 for the 3G S. –engadget

via engadget and fubiz.



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