Buttons and Pins – Ran Hwang (11 pics)


Instead of using ordinary buttons and pins to stitch up clothes, Korean-born artist Ran Hwang creates amazingly large installations of birds and cherry blossom trees. When you look up close, the amount of individual buttons is somewhat overwhelming, but from afar, the installation transforms into one breathtaking image.

“My immense wall installations are extremely time consuming and repetitive manual work,” says Hwang. “This is a form of meditative practice that helps me find my inner peace. Pins are used to hold buttons onto the surface to form a silhouetted image, or to disintegrate such image. No adhesive is used so the buttons are free to stay and move, which implies the genetic human tendency to be irresolute. I use buttons because they are common and ordinary, like the existence of human beings.”

“By hammering thousands of pins onto a wall, I discover significance of existence,” she adds. “Like the monks practicing Zen facing the wall, my work is a form of performance that leads to finding oneself.” Hwang graduated from the School of Visual Arts in NYC and has exhibited her work in New York, Paris and Seoul.


The artist

Ran Hwang’s website

More Awesome Artwork:
22 of the Coolest Sculptures You’ll Ever See
Skeletons Come to Life! – Sal Hernndez (10 photos)
Underwater Alien Sculptures – Jason de Caires: UK
Making the Ordinary Extraordinary – Unbelievable Paper Cut Sculptures by Peter Callesen: Denmark
Paper Sculptures by Jen Stark



December 10, 2016

World Map Reveals What Each Country Does Better Than Any Other

Designer David McCandless of Information is Beautiful has created a fascinating world map called International Number Ones. “Because every country is the best at something,” McCandless also offers the caveat that this accolade is “according to data,” which makes perfect sense once you study the map. Being the number one at something isn’t necessarily a compliment. Many countries are the “best” when it comes to issues that are morally reprehensible.

Read Article


December 9, 2016

Intricately Detailed Floating Cube Casts Stunning Shadows

We have always been big fans of Pakistan-born artist Anila Quayyum Agha’s mesmerizing art. In 2014, we raved about Intersections, a captivating wooden cube that cast dreamy shadows with a single light bulb. Fortunately for us, Agha is still creating intricate installations in this style, with her most recent, radiant piece being All The Flowers Are For Me. Like Intersections, All The Flowers Are For Me plays with light and space.

Read Article


Get Our Weekly Newsletter