Complex Illustrations Formed with Tangles of Colorful Wires


Greece-based artist Charis Tsevis is fascinated with the wired world we live in. No matter how wireless technology continues to develop, we still find ourselves dependent upon outlets for data transfer and power, and, if we look around, it’s standard to be surrounded by a handful of plugs throughout any room.

In response to his fascination, Tsevis developed this series of wire illustrations for a number of editorial and advertising purposes. The impressively detailed illustrations feature a maze of wires tangled together to form figures, faces, and animals. He uses all types of colorful wires, from USB cords to phone cables, which snake out towards the edges and create a sense of motion and energy moving throughout each composition.

The perfectly arranged lines draw upon both the positive and negative space to redefine technology through a creative exploration of forms. Tsevis says, “All of them have to do with the relationship between the network and the human body and spirit.”














Charis Tsevis’ website
via [Marvelous]



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