Woman Photoshops Present-Day Self into Childhood Photos

1982 and 2005, Paris, France

Tokyo-born, London-based photographer Chino Otsuka takes the past and present photo project to a new level of expert photo manipulation with her series titled Imagine Finding Me. Rather than simply recreating old photographs as an adult, she inserts her present-day self into photos from her childhood. The result is an incredibly believable image that features photos of Otsuka as a little girl in the 70s and 80s standing side by side with herself as a modern-day woman.

Essentially, the series presents a double portrait of Otsuka and the many places she’s visited as a kid. With the advantages of using digital software and technology to merge her past and present self, the photographer is able to create these unique self-portraits. She says, “The digital process becomes a tool, almost like a time machine as I’m embarking on the journey to where I once belonged and at the same time becoming a tourist in my own history.”


1976 and 2005, Kamakura, Japan


1977 and 2009, Jardin du Luxembourg, France


1979 and 2006, Kitakamakura, Japan


1975 and 2005, Spain


1980 and 2009, Nagayama, Japan


1981 and 2006, Ofuna, Japan


1982 and 2006, Tokyo, Japan


1984 and 2005, London, UK


1985 and 2005, Tiananmen Square, Beijing, China

Chino Otsuka website
via [Faith is Torment, Daily Mail]



December 10, 2016

World Map Reveals What Each Country Does Better Than Any Other

Designer David McCandless of Information is Beautiful has created a fascinating world map called International Number Ones. “Because every country is the best at something,” McCandless also offers the caveat that this accolade is “according to data,” which makes perfect sense once you study the map. Being the number one at something isn’t necessarily a compliment. Many countries are the “best” when it comes to issues that are morally reprehensible.

Read Article


December 9, 2016

Intricately Detailed Floating Cube Casts Stunning Shadows

We have always been big fans of Pakistan-born artist Anila Quayyum Agha’s mesmerizing art. In 2014, we raved about Intersections, a captivating wooden cube that cast dreamy shadows with a single light bulb. Fortunately for us, Agha is still creating intricate installations in this style, with her most recent, radiant piece being All The Flowers Are For Me. Like Intersections, All The Flowers Are For Me plays with light and space.

Read Article


Get Our Weekly Newsletter