Historical Figures Playfully Portrayed as Cats and Dogs

Cat Queen


Animals From History is a playful series that ties together history lessons with incredibly detailed animal illustrations. Created by Christina Hess, each full color print features a famous character portrayed by a well-dressed cat or a dog. Hess pairs her illustrations with the elaborate life stories of cleverly named characters like Elvis Petme, Cleocatra, and Joan of Bark.

The ornate portraits are filled with adventurous scenes, elegant garb, and intricate details that look almost lifelike, and viewers will be intrigued by the furry friends and foes of our past. Luckily, we can discover more by reading the accompanying fictional tales, which combine real events and the artist’s imagination to charm both children and adults. “This collection is a fun way for people to become introduced and reintroduced to history while allowing a twist of imagination to guide their interest forward,” explains Hess.


Jizo Bodhissatva


Napoleon Boneaparte


Cleocatra


King Henry V


The Fitzgeralds


ML Jobs


Bruno the Brave


Jean Lafeet


Joan of Bark


Marie Antoinippe


Elvis Petme


Miguel Dog Cervantes

Christina Hess’ website
Animals From History website
via [Juxtapoz]



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