Romantic Cinematic Photos in the Rain and Snow


Generally, people don’t look forward to getting caught in the rain or stuck in a snowstorm, but photographer Christophe Jacrot makes it seem like an incredibly beautiful experience. The French photographer’s body of work features several images of huddled pedestrians walking along soaked streets and ivory coated paths trying to withstand the weather. Jacrot romanticizes the rain, turning the soggy into the stunning. Some of his shots depicting reflective puddles are even reminiscent of Gavin Hammond’s London in Puddles.

The photographer says, “In my opinion, there are two ways of capturing the world for a photographer; on the one hand grasping its horror, and on the other sublimating it. I have chosen the second. More specifically, I like the way rain, snow and ‘bad weather’ awaken a feeling of romantic fiction within me (climatic excesses are another topic).

“I see these elements as a fabulous ground for photography, an under-used visual universe with a strong evocative power, and with a richness of subtle lights. This universe escapes most of us, since we are too occupied getting undercover. Man becomes a ghostly silhouette wandering and obeying the hazards of rain or of snow.

“My approach is deliberately pictorial and emotional.”




















Christophe Jacrot website



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