Rare Photos of NYC’s Gritty Subway Conditions in 1981

In the 1980s, the New York City subway was a gritty center for gangs and crime. The trains were covered with graffiti and being a passenger alone late at night was not recommended. But, in 1981, fearless young photographer Christopher Morris wasn’t deterred by the frequent violence and harsh conditions.

Only 22-years-old at the time, Morris was working as an intern at photo agency Black Star and was determined to make something of himself as a photographer. So, without hesitation, he ventured underground to document the NYC experiences through his lens. This captivating series depicts the poorly lit cars, the dirty windows, and the overall decrepit conditions of New York’s underground transportation.

Today, the award-winning photojournalist is also a contract photographer for TIME. According to the agency, the recently rediscovered photographs “provide a window on a long-gone New York, a metropolis that once pulsed with a very different energy–a frenetic, dangerous tone–than one feels in most of the city’s neighborhoods today. But even back then, as Morris’ pictures attest, Gotham remained an always fascinating and, at times, disarmingly beautiful place.”

















Christopher Morris’ website
via [Juxtapoz]



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January 20, 2017

19 Most Creative Water Fountains From Around the World

Water fountains have a long place in our history. Dating back to the Ancient Roman times, these reservoirs were first designed with a purely practical purpose—for holding precious drinking water and bathing. These early fountains were uncovered, free standing, and placed along the street for public consumption. (Wealthier folks also had them in their homes.)

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