Playful Indoor Slide Sweeps Through Modern Home


New York-based architect David Hotson, in collaboration with designer Ghislaine Vias, has completed an ambitious architectural project known as SkyHouse that features a wonderful blend of modernity and everlasting childhood. The four-story complex, atop a Manhattan skyscraper, is filled with eye-catching geometric, contemporary design but it is the inclusion of glass bridges, adventurous wall climbing fixtures, and especially a playful slide that sets it apart from other living spaces.

Inspired by artist Carsten Hller’s Test Site installation at London’s Tate Modern in 2006, Hotson incorporated a similar slide in SkyHouse that allows its residents to swoop down from floor-to-floor. The mirror polished stainless steel tube invites anyone with a playful spirit to reach in through the circular entrance and spiral down through the unique apartment. There is a brief break at the third floor where one has the opportunity to exit but there is also the choice to re-enter the slide for a quick trip to the main level.










David Hotson website
via [Fubiz]



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