The Absolute Beauty of Solitude in Nature


19-year-old Vancouver-based photographer Elizabeth Gadd whisks us away on a magical journey, away from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. In her series, aptly titled Breath, each of the images feature one individual centered in a picturesque background within nature. All of the shots convey a different emotion dependent upon how the subject responds to the environment. Some look relieved and giddy, while others look contemplative or dejected yet all are beautiful in their own right.

By looking at her portfolio, it’s clear that Gadd is an up-and-coming photographer to keep our eyes on. She has that rare, innate ability to combine the beauty of nature with her excellent portraiture skills, all while capturing raw emotion in every shot.

“I’m 19 years young, I might be kind of a hippie, and I’m in love with nature and creation,” says Gadd, as she describes herself. “I’m a quieter kind of person, not so talkative as most, but I do love to listen. My two dogs are my best friends and I could easily spend the rest of my life hiking and adventuring with my pups and a camera.”














Elizabeth Gadd on Flickr



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