Spectacular Woven Glass Sculptures by Markow & Norris

Artistic duo Eric Markow and Thom Norris have developed an incredibly eye-catching aesthetic for their glass sculptures that incorporates a time-consuming weaving technique. The craftsmen’s resulting woven glass sculptures reveal a beautifully seamless fusion of artistic methods and medium that reflect their keen eye for detail and color.

Each sculpture in the pair’s growing collection of glass creations exhibits this meticulous technique of weaving strips of glass over and under one another. Unlike the similar process involved in the relatively quick construction of wicker baskets, the woven glass sculptures are not easily bent and their sculptural designs require skilled hands to manipulate the glass. Markow and Norris’ medium of choice may prove to be an inconvenient material to weave with, but they manage to produce incredibly detailed structures, from origami cranes to life-size kimonos boasting a brilliant spectrum of colors.









Markow & Norris website
via [Ufansius]



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