Fantasy-Fueled Scenes (10 pieces)

A Boy Returns Home Not Realizing How Much He's Changed
Using a variety of mixed media including oil, acrylic, ink, charcoal and graphite, artist Ian Francis creates fantasy-fueled scenes that are filled with mystery and intrigue. In 2010, he released a new set of work that looks as if he’s shifted his style from dream-like to cinematic.

The UK-based painter will be headlining his first solo exhibition at the prestigious Joshua Liner Gallery in New York. Called Fireland, it will consist of over a dozen new mixed media works on canvas as well as a selection of new works on paper. The show will run from March 3 to April 2, 2011.

Love the descriptive titles he includes with each piece.


A Strange Ghost Follows a Girl to the Edge of a River


Walking Down a Street a Person is Crushed by Light


Three People Lose Track of Time in the Financial District of San Francisco


Five People Crack up at the Opera House


A Strange Ghost Follows a Girl to the Edge of a River


Girl on a Park Bench


An Island Finally Comes to an End Over and Over Again in 2010


Girl on a Park Bench


A Girl's Newfound Love for Technology Grows to Fill Her Whole World

Joshua Liner Gallery website

Related:
Contemporary Dream State – Ian Francis



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