Architectural Sculptures Made of Old Computer Parts

Italian artist Franco Recchia puts old computer parts and the inner components of various technology to use for the production of his architectural sculptures that mimic urban landscapes. From motherboards and hard drives to radiator parts and metal scraps, Recchia repurposes the discarded materials, transforming the mere bits of tech junk into model urban landscapes, paying homage to the modern metropolises of the world.

The artist assembles the materials in such a way that it looks as though you’re a giant looking down at a high-tech city. It’s this sensation coupled with the sculptor’s medium and subject of choice that reminds me of an old kids show from the 90s (similar to Power Ranger) called Superhuman Samurai Syber-Squad, which featured an exaggerated look into a computer that resembles Recchia’s circuit board skyscrapers. At any moment, I’m expecting to see a Godzilla-like monster thrash through.












Franco Recchia website
via [Recyclart]





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Beautiful Vintage Light Bulbs Feature Luminous Floral Filaments

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