Eye-Opening Portraits of Living Conditions for Animals in Zoos


Captive is a powerful series by Washington D.C.-based Canadian photographer Gaston Lacombe that takes a look at animals in zoos and their living environments. Shooting his images from the perspective of any regular visitor, Lacombe manages to capture portraits of creatures, big and small, confined to the spaces they’ve been provided by the zoos they’ve been forced to inhabit.

The series, which documents the viewable conditions that animals live in at zoos from nine different countries on five different continents, leaves each institution in anonymity. Choosing not to reveal any specific names of these wildlife exhibition spaces, Lacombe draws attention to all zoos rather than just shaming a few. He says, “Even in the very best of zoos you still find animals placed in horrible cement enclosures or little glass boxes.”

The photographer adds, “Not all zoos are equal. Some make great efforts to provide their animals with adequate and comfortable habitats, and some others can only be described as animal torture chambers. However, in all zoos, there are always some animals wedged in habitats that are inappropriate, inadequate and uncomfortable. I still haven’t seen any exceptions to this.”










Gaston Lacombe website
via [thinx, Wired]





December 2, 2016

Sexy French Farmers Pose for Shirtless 2017 Calendar

Last year, the holiday season was set ablaze by France’s Pompiers Sans Frontières (Firefighters Without Borders) and their sizzling, stripped-down calendar. Shot for a good cause by renowned Paris-based fashion photographer Fred Goudon, the risqué calendar proved to be a popular Christmas gift—both in France and abroad. In keeping with tradition, Goudon has photographed a new crop of au naturel pin-up models for his 2018 edition: French farmers.

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December 1, 2016

Meticulous Landscape Paintings Beautifully Represent Intangible Emotional States

Artist Crystal Liu intimately ties her emotional states to beautiful abstract paintings. In large-scale works, she constructs landscapes that are metaphors for the intangible forces that drive us. Visually, elements of the Earth and sky are the actors for the feelings we cannot easily imagine. Together, the sun, mountains, and more depict “narratives of conflict, entrapment, longing, and precarious hope.” These symbols allow Liu to seem removed, yet make the pieces deeply personal.

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