The Giant Traveling Skeleton


Late Italian artist Gino De Dominicis was a man of mystery whose works often exhibited a surrealistic look at the human form, elongating, contracting, and distorting physical elements. His enormous sculptural piece titled Calamita Cosmica, translated as “Cosmic Magnet”, follows the multifaceted artist’s scheme of work. The 28-meter-long anomaly depicts an anatomically correct human skeleton, with the exception a pointy, beak-like nose in classic De Dominicis fashion.

Despite having passed away in 1998, the sculptor’s piece has continued to tour the world, popping up in cities across the globe. There are many reports on the Internet that pinpoint the sculpture’s whereabouts, leaving markers all over Europe–Milan, Versailles, Belgium. Forget Carmen San Diego, where in the world is Calamita Cosmica? According to several accounts, the sculpture has settled in Rome at MAXXI, the National Centre of Contemporary Arts.






via [Amusing Planet]



January 24, 2017

Creative Dad Turns Son’s Drawings Into Awesome Anime Characters

French animator and anime artist Thomas Romain has recently started collaborating with two unlikely artists: his young sons. Much like their father, the boys love to draw and design characters. To show them the capability of their creativity, Romain often turns their doodles into professional-level concept art. Romain began his unique anime drawings series last month, when he and one of his sons designed and rendered a star-studded alien.

Read Article


January 24, 2017

New Intricately Detailed Tiny Animal Embroideries Made With Meticulous Stitching

Embroidery artist Chloe Giordano crafts stunningly sewn hoop art at an impossibly small scale. After first marveling at her embroidered animals last year, she’s back with even more meticulously stitched woodland creatures. Some of them are no larger than a thimble. Using subtle color changes and countless passes of the satin stitch, Giordano mimics the look of fur on hopping rabbits, sleepy squirrels, and scurrying mice.

Read Article


Get Our Weekly Newsletter