Holographic Cubes Reflect Dazzling Spectrum of Colors

Have you ever found photos of an art installation that made you wish you could travel back in time? For us, this is one of them. Quantum Field X3 was an installation, by Japanese artist Hiro Yamagata, that was created for the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, Spain back in 2004. It consisted of two huge cube-like structures that were covered in holographic panels. Laser beams were projected onto the panels, which reflected and refracted visible light frequencies into a dazzling array of colors. As the museum stated, “Exceeding the natural limits of human perception, the work makes light particles visible to the naked eye in fascinating play of light and form.”

Recognized as a pioneer of contemporary laser art, Yamagata once said, “Our visual perception is limited to 0.38 percent of the emitted solar light spectrum. Though it is natural for humans to believe they perceive everything, there is quite a bit of natural phenomena that our senses are simply not aware of.”

Photo credit: Abriwin


Photo via: Guggenheim Bilbao


Photo credit: Sakura Saku

Guggenheim BIlbao’s website



January 23, 2017

31 of the Most Creative Protest Signs From the Global Women’s March

The Women’s March on Washington and its accompanying sister marches—in the US and around the world—drew over five million people to streets on Saturday, January 21. Those who marched spoke in favor of equal rights for all women as well as in protest of President Donald Trump. And they didn’t show up empty-handed, either; many people made handcrafted signs to make their voice even louder.

Read Article


January 23, 2017

Cinephile’s Ongoing Project Reveals Color Palettes Found in Famous Films

Fantastic cinematography can make a film unforgettable. When done well, it’s like every still frame is a work of art. Color plays a vital role in this, and a cinematographer’s choices set the mood of a scene. Graphic designer Ruby Radulescu demonstrates the importance of a movie’s color spectrum in a fascinating series called Movies in Color. The premise is simple: she creates detailed color palettes based on a frame of a famous film.

Read Article


Get Our Weekly Newsletter