Honda Music Road: Highway to Heaven or Hell?

Clever idea from Honda but one that I could see be very annoying for those living nearby who had to hear the same song over and over again… From Jalopnik: This strip of road in Lancaster, California is one of only a handful of roads in the world that will “sing” as you drive over it. The music comes from the noise made by tires passing over a series of carefully cut groves in the road’s surface. Now local residents want it all to be paved over, just because not everyone drives a Honda Civic at exactly the right speed. Made by Honda as part of an upcoming advertising campaign, the road’s incredibly out-of-tune rendition of “The William Tell Overture” (you might know it as the theme from The Lone Ranger) attracted tourists but annoyed locals to no end. Honda states that the road was tuned specifically to the tires and wheelbase of a Civic, so that may explain why it sounds so terrible in this video. We’re thinking that the neighbors living about a half mile away and can’t get to sleep at night from the racket really don’t care to hear it at all. The actual commercial:



January 20, 2017

Floating Cabin Lets Nature-Lovers Sleep in the Treetops of Sweden

If you’ve ever dreamed of cuddling up in a contemporary treehouse, the 7th Room Treehotel may be your new favorite getaway. Designed by Snøhetta—a design office that dabbles in landscaping, architecture, interiors, and brand design—the floating bungalow is tucked away in Northern Sweden and perfectly positioned for a sweeping view of the Northern Lights. The 7th Room is elevated by twelve 10-meter stilts and is beautifully built around the towering trunk of a pine tree.

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January 20, 2017

19 Most Creative Water Fountains From Around the World

Water fountains have a long place in our history. Dating back to the Ancient Roman times, these reservoirs were first designed with a purely practical purpose—for holding precious drinking water and bathing. These early fountains were uncovered, free standing, and placed along the street for public consumption. (Wealthier folks also had them in their homes.)

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