Man Spent 15 Years Building a Massive 5-Story Tree House

Anyone who ever wanted to have a small tree house in their backyard will be totally amazed by this massive construction, The World’s Biggest Tree House, located in Crossville, Tennessee. Designed by Minister Horace Burgess, the structure relies on six oak trees as the base to support all five stories, which collectively stand 97-feet-high.

According to Burgess, his inspiration to build the tree house originated from a vision he had in 1993. He says, “I was praying to God and he said, ‘If you build me a treehouse, I will get you all the supplies.” To develop the project, the minister spent $12,000 and used mostly recycled materials across the course of 15 years. All of the wood is held together by exactly 258,000 nails, put into place by Burgess and a handful of volunteers.

Inside, there are more than 80 rooms, including a sanctuary, which can also be used as a small basketball court, as well as a church and bell tower, an antique church pew, a stained-glass window of Jesus, and a choir loft. This year, the building finally made it into the Guinness Book of World Record, which really does make it the largest church in the sky. As a bonus, from the roof, one can see the word ‘Jesus’ spelled out with grass in a field nearby.

Top photo: Chuck Sutherland


The Road Junkies


The Road Junkies


The Road Junkies


The Road Junkies


The Road Junkies


Frank Kehren


Frank Kehren


Frank Kehren

via [CJWHO]





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