Giant Steel Snake Sculpture Ferociously Spans 170 Feet Long

Designed by Chinese-French artist Huang Yong Ping, Ressort is a gigantic aluminum snake skeleton that was commissioned by the Queensland Art Gallery in Australia for the Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT). APT is a major art event held annually at the Queensland Art Gallery/Gallery of Modern Art and features contemporary art from Asia, the Pacific, and Australia.

Ping has designed a handful of these snake sculptures as a reference to a central symbol of Chinese culture. Ranging in size and location, including Germany and France, his work attempts to introduce parts of Chinese culture to the West. Ressort stands on display in the Gallery’s Watermall and extends more than 170 feet long from the floor to the ceiling. The large scale is authoritative and dominates the space without overpowering the room. Ping points out that, although the sculpture appears massive in the context of the gallery space, in another setting it may appear small and that everything is relative to the circumstances. According to his bio, “His massive installations rework architectural and animal forms into complex tableaux, drawing in elements of the sites in which they are constructed.”







via [QAGOMA]





December 2, 2016

Upside Down Christmas Tree Hangs in the Halls of Tate Britain

  Every December, the Tate Britain debuts its much-anticipated Christmas tree. Designed by a different contemporary artist each year, the famed museum’s trees are both yuletide decorations and works of modern art. This year, Iranian installation artist Shirazeh Houshiary has quite literally turned the tradition on its head with her upside-down evergreen. Suspended by its trunk, the tree hovers above the main entrance’s stunning spiral staircase.

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December 2, 2016

Photographer Searches for Mystery Wedding Couple After Discovering Film in 50-Year-Old Camera

You never know what you’ll find when you buy something that’s vintage. When photographer Alex Galmeanu bought a rare 50-year-old camera off eBay, he never expected to find an exposed (but undeveloped) roll of film inside. “Of course I had it developed right away,” he wrote, “and, as a surprise again, I was able to recover 10 quite usable images, especially when considering their age.

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