Playfully Interpreting Ideas Through Photo Manipulation


Los Angeles-based photographer Hugh Kretschmer takes us on a surreal journey with his vast portfolio of conceptual work. He playfully visualizes scenes and provides literal interpretations, with a little photo manipulation, of ideas like an “enveloping sea” which features a sea of actual envelopes. Kretchmer’s work is teeming with puns that take you out of your comfort zone and and awaken the mind. Without knowing the title of each witty image, a sort of game is created where the spectator tries to pinpoint what idiom or idea Kretschmer is creatively translating.

The editorial and fine art photographer’s works have a certain humor to them that sometimes even appear cartoonish in their nature. Kretschmer expresses the gloomy dispositions of a man by placing an isolated dark cloud over the sulking pedestrian, as we often see in animated features. Despite it being an idea we’ve seen before, it doesn’t take away from the effective storytelling in the image. He also comically represents what we can only assume is a businessman as a stack money in a suit, which can be seen as personal commentary. His work is meant to be both entertaining and thought-provoking.













Hugh Kretschmer website
via [Faith is Torment]



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