Hunt Rettig – Mixed Media Art

Who would’ve thought that polyester film, acrylics, staples,glass and thermoplastic rubber would make something which exudes ethereal calm. Hunt Rettigs work resembles photographs or even paintings while they aren’t. These are actually three dimensional sculptures placed behind frosted glass. As you move around the object it changes light colour and dimension.I also would’ve never thought that his work expresses his thoughts about what “Native American” means to him.“At what point is native native?My current work explores a new Native American landscape. We live in a land where ‘native species’ is a clich. It’s an ideal that might not even exist anymore, other than in the minds of some well-meaning but ultimately naive thinkers. But if this ideal does exist, should we even care? When an outsider species is introduced and proliferates in a beautiful, sublime or even ugly way, is that not American? Is it not more American than the original species that it subsumed? This is Native America, the country of consumption and subsumption. America the Beautiful. Native America the Beautiful. We are a people and a culture and a place that is constantly changing, constantly consuming itself. And in that consumption comes new growth – bigger, smaller, better, worse, more beautiful and ugly than ever before. And as Native Americans, that is something we should celebrate. Because to deny it and fight it is to deny and fight ourselves. I choose celebration.”





December 7, 2016

Mom Prepares Healthy Meals as Cartoon Characters for Son to Eat

Getting pint-sized, picky eaters to finish their fruits and vegetables can be a tricky task for many parents. For food artist Laleh Mohmedi, however, it’s a piece of cake. Using healthy ingredients and a bit of creativity, the Melbourne mom dishes out meals inspired by her 4-year-old son’s favorite animated characters. From expressive Pixar monsters to a spot-on Spongebob Squarepants, Mohmedi reproduces a range of beloved childhood icons out of meat, pasta, and other dinner staples.

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December 7, 2016

Beautiful Vintage Light Bulbs Feature Luminous Floral Filaments

LED light bulbs are all the rage nowadays, but you can’t beat the timeless beauty of vintage filaments. Between the late 1930s and into the 1970s, the Aerolux Light Corporation produced novelty bulbs with tiny sculptures inside. These decorative filaments take the shapes of flowers and birds which are electrically illuminated in a variety of vibrant colors. To construct these bulbs, Aerolux used low-pressure gas in their filaments—either neon, argon, or both.

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