Incredible Portrait Made of Dice


To commemorated his friend’s death, Frederick McSwain decided that he needed to do something special. You see, his friend was Canadian artist and designer Tobias Wong, who died at the age of 13,138 days (35 years-old).

McSwain used 13,138 dice to create an immense portrait of Wong called Die. It was part of the BrokenOff BrokenOff exhibition at Gallery R'Pure in New York City, which was a memoriam to the artist during New York Design Week.

"The idea of a die itself was appropriate–the randomness of life," says McSwain. "It felt like [a medium] he would use. Because [Tobias] was a very street-level force, I thought it was appropriate [to install] the portrait on the floor. It’s not something I wanted to suspend on the wall; I wanted it to be right there on the floor where you almost interact with it.

"The idea of every decision you make and everything you've done in your life, defines who you are. All of those days symbolically makes up the image of Tobi." With such creativity as this, there is no doubt in our minds that Tobi would have been proud.



Frederick McSwain’s website
via [This Is Colossal]



January 20, 2017

Floating Cabin Lets Nature-Lovers Sleep in the Treetops of Sweden

If you’ve ever dreamed of cuddling up in a contemporary treehouse, the 7th Room Treehotel may be your new favorite getaway. Designed by Snøhetta—a design office that dabbles in landscaping, architecture, interiors, and brand design—the floating bungalow is tucked away in Northern Sweden and perfectly positioned for a sweeping view of the Northern Lights. The 7th Room is elevated by twelve 10-meter stilts and is beautifully built around the towering trunk of a pine tree.

Read Article


January 20, 2017

19 Most Creative Water Fountains From Around the World

Water fountains have a long place in our history. Dating back to the Ancient Roman times, these reservoirs were first designed with a purely practical purpose—for holding precious drinking water and bathing. These early fountains were uncovered, free standing, and placed along the street for public consumption. (Wealthier folks also had them in their homes.)

Read Article


Get Our Weekly Newsletter