Amazingly Hyperrealistic Drawings Created Directly on Wood

Using pencils and pastels, Singapore-based artist Ivan Hoo produces amazingly hyperrealistic illustrations drawn directly on the surface of wood. The impressive works are filled with mind-boggling details that look incredibly realistic.

The skilled artist plays with perspective to develop everyday objects like a crumpled piece of paper, a spilled Coke can, cracked eggs, or a broken vase. It’s hard to believe that the drawings are handmade, and viewers will want to more closely investigate each piece to confirm that the wonderfully precise illustrations are not actually real life objects.

"By working on wood, it gives me a lot of dimension and ideas to create something close to reality and it works really well with pastels, too" Hoo explains. "I started to experiment on wood some years back with mainly portraits as my subject before going further with a different concept."

Ivan Hoo on Instagram
via [Toxel], [Emphasight]





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