Revolutionary Ocean Skyscraper Designed for Research

Designed by French architect Jacques Rougerie, the 170 feet (51m) tall SeaOrbiter will be the first vertical skyscraper ship of its kind. Two-thirds of the spectacular vessel is underwater, perfect for accommodating a team of 18-22 researchers who will be able to spend 24 hours a day underwater.

Researchers will use the facilities for a variety of purposes, including studying marine biology and climate change, looking for shipwrecks, and even utilizing pressurized environments to simulate being in space for astronauts. To top it off, the craft is completely sustainable with its power coming from solar, wind and waves.

"One of the first users will be the science community," says Rougerie. "It's designed to explore the ocean in a new way, mainly spending time under the sea, giving people the opportunity to live under the sea for a very long time, to observe, to undertake research missions, like marine biology, oceanography and climate issues."

After over 30 years of research into marine architecture, the $52.7 million SeaOrbiter project has its funding secured and construction is slated to begin by the end of the year.








SeaOrbiter website
via [Dezeen], [Inhabitat]



January 24, 2017

Creative Dad Turns Son’s Drawings Into Awesome Anime Characters

French animator and anime artist Thomas Romain has recently started collaborating with two unlikely artists: his young sons. Much like their father, the boys love to draw and design characters. To show them the capability of their creativity, Romain often turns their doodles into professional-level concept art. Romain began his unique anime drawings series last month, when he and one of his sons designed and rendered a star-studded alien.

Read Article


January 24, 2017

New Intricately Detailed Tiny Animal Embroideries Made With Meticulous Stitching

Embroidery artist Chloe Giordano crafts stunningly sewn hoop art at an impossibly small scale. After first marveling at her embroidered animals last year, she’s back with even more meticulously stitched woodland creatures. Some of them are no larger than a thimble. Using subtle color changes and countless passes of the satin stitch, Giordano mimics the look of fur on hopping rabbits, sleepy squirrels, and scurrying mice.

Read Article


Get Our Weekly Newsletter