19-Year-Old’s Dramatically Artistic Self-Portraits


Freelance photographer Jared Tyler is another promising teen–like Alex Stoddard, Brian Oldham, and Nicholas Scarpinato–with a creative outlook on the world. Based in Kalamazoo, Michigan, where the 19-year-old attends Western Michigan University, Tyler finds an artistic and emotional outlet in his expressive photography. The young photographer manages to capture the essence of his varied sentiments in life without saying a word.

Like the aforementioned youthful photographers, Tyler is known to stand in the frame himself to play the dual role of photographer and model. His self-portraits reveal a personal side to his portfolio, exposing his own feelings that can vary from being somber and subdued to reflective and, at times, passionate. The photographer may be young, but he possesses a knowledge of visual themes and techniques that surpass his years, at one point even giving a nod to Dali’s melting clocks. Tyler’s incorporation of surreal elements is something to be excited about as it is only a tease for what is to come.















Jared Tyler on Flickr
via [Cuded]



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