Fancy Marie Antoinette-Inspired Helicopter


Lisbon-based artist Joana Vasconcelos has certainly jazzed up this helicopter. The particular aircraft, a piece of art entitled Lilicoptre, is Vasconcelos’ interpretation of what Marie Antoinette would have chosen for her personal travels if she were alive today. The base of the piece is a Bell 47 helicopter, and the artist decorated it, inside and out, with ostrich feathers, Swarovski crystals, gold leaf, industrial coating, dyed leather upholstery embossed with fine gold, Arraiolos rugs, walnut wood, wood grain painting, and elaborate gold braided trimmings.

According to the artist statement, the piece “draws on the rich, glamorous and bold aesthetics of the royalty of the late Ancien Rgime in order to suggest a metamorphosis from machine to animal; a return to the origin and to the inspiration that motivated the realization of man’s dream of flying.” The modern installation, a part of the artist's 2012 solo exhibition at the Palace of Versaille, sat in strong juxtaposition against the ornately decorated, 17th century room. Regardless of the time period, anyone finding themselves a passenger in this fancy aircraft would surely get a kick out of riding in such ultimate and over-the-top style.







Joana Vasconcelos’ website
via [Laughing Squid]



January 15, 2017

Timeless Photos Capture the Dreamy Villages of Cinque Terre

The Cinque Terre, a string of rustic coastal villages along Italy’s Ligurian Coast has long been an inspiration for travel photographers. With plunging cliffs and dramatic vistas, the small towns are ripe for postcard perfect photography. But when Slovenian photographer Jaka Bulc traveled to the Cinque Terre, he immersed himself in a different side of the towns. The result is a set of timeless images that peel back the layers of the well-loved vacation spot.

Read Article


January 14, 2017

Portraits of Legendary Musicians Painted on Vinyl Records

For years, Arizona-based artist Daniel Edlen has created show-stopping works of vinyl art. Inventively using records as his canvas, Edlen has redefined “album art” with his painted portraits of iconic singers and beloved bands. To create each masterpiece, Edlen applies acrylic paint directly onto the record’s vinyl. Stark, black-and-white tones enable each singer’s portrait to dramatically pop from its black background, and delicate, dappled brushstrokes reminiscent of pointillism emphasize the surface’s unique contours.

Read Article


Get Our Weekly Newsletter