Incredibly Lively Ink Illustrations Cover Unusual Surfaces

UK-based illustrator Johanna Basford transforms simple white surfaces into all kinds of captivating ink illustrations. Preferring pens and pencils to pixels, the artist says, “For me, computer generated graphics can feel cold and soulless whereas hand drawing captures a sense of energy and character which no pixel can ever replicate.” Every one of her illustration begins first as a pencil sketch, which she then further develops into the flora and fauna-inspired final designs.

In a recent exhibit at Dundee Contemporary Arts, Basford produced these two pieces entitled Inky Bodies and Sailing Ship. The collection features solid white sculptures covered with visually strong and invigorating hand-penned tattoos. Each drawing involves a complex series of interwoven lines and shapes that produce a sense of movement and lively energy. From a distance, the objects are covered in a gorgeous floral design but as viewers move closer, they will be pleasantly surprised by the incredible detail that is revealed. Basford says, “My delicate hand inked designs intend to charm and delight, inviting you to peer closer and discover the hidden intricacies.”













Johanna Basford’s website
via [The Womb]



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