Depicting Raw Emotion Through Powerful Faceless Figures

London-based artist Justin Harris utilizes a mix of media (oil, acrylic, pencil, and pastel on canvas) to create four powerful pieces for his series titled The Writer. The illustrator uses faceless figurative forms to depict an assortment of raw emotion. Each fragmented subject is seen crossing over the blank, empty canvas onto a designated grid of color, though their figure remains black and white.

Despite entering a small window of lively color splashes and scribbles, that artist’s figures are confined to their monochromatic state. They present this duality of creativity that writers often face–being able to entertain others with their art, yet finding difficulty in crawling out of their own depression. The images offer a dramatic visual of the contrast between the writer’s drained inner conflict versus the colorfully creative output. There’s also a vulnerability to the naked subjects who are either seeking to cover themselves or reaching with outstretched arms.







Justin Harris on Behance
via [Devid Sketchbook]





December 2, 2016

Sexy French Farmers Pose for Shirtless 2017 Calendar

Last year, the holiday season was set ablaze by France’s Pompiers Sans Frontières (Firefighters Without Borders) and their sizzling, stripped-down calendar. Shot for a good cause by renowned Paris-based fashion photographer Fred Goudon, the risqué calendar proved to be a popular Christmas gift—both in France and abroad. In keeping with tradition, Goudon has photographed a new crop of au naturel pin-up models for his 2018 edition: French farmers.

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December 1, 2016

Meticulous Landscape Paintings Beautifully Represent Intangible Emotional States

Artist Crystal Liu intimately ties her emotional states to beautiful abstract paintings. In large-scale works, she constructs landscapes that are metaphors for the intangible forces that drive us. Visually, elements of the Earth and sky are the actors for the feelings we cannot easily imagine. Together, the sun, mountains, and more depict “narratives of conflict, entrapment, longing, and precarious hope.” These symbols allow Liu to seem removed, yet make the pieces deeply personal.

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