Korean High School Students Take Hilariously Random Yearbook Photos

While most high schools publish yearbooks with specific themes and fill in the bulk of the book with standard portraits of students against a plain backdrop, there are some Korean high schools who take a more free approach to assembling the memento. They allow students to take random and often hilarious photos of themselves, making for a really unusual keepsake of high school memories.

Recently, a number of yearbook photos from Jeonju Haesung High School in South Korea were scanned and shared, bringing delight to anyone who viewed them. The creative and funny images feature these inventive teens transforming themselves into wild versions of themselves. From imitating the Joker and Ironman to gender-bending into Minnie Mouse and creating a Ron Burgundy-esque alter ego (mustache and all), these teens are definitely leaving photos that are sure to be a riot to look back at.














via [RocketNews24, Today Humor, maru1]
Thanks for the tip, Mindy!



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