Classic Works of Art Made with Jelly Beans


A few years ago, Jelly Belly officially hired painter and illustrator Kristen Cumings to produce several works of art to add to their collection entitled Jelly Belly Masterpieces of Confectionary Art. The California-based painter takes about 50-60 hours to complete the life-size paintings made of approximately 9,000 to 12,000 jelly beans each. The enormous 4 x 6 feet murals each depict a classic work of art, from Vincent can Gogh’s The Starry Night to Johannes Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring.

The artist’s process involves spray adhesives to initially stick the beans to the canvas and then coating the finished product in acrylic for protection. The intricate detail and blend of colors in each piece is brilliantly executed. Cumings is clearly an expert at work. Her keen eye has an unmatched grasp of jelly bean color configuration that adds shade, tone, and definition impeccably. It’s hard to believe that she not only manages to recreate these works but has done so in front of a live audience.








Kristen Cumings website
via [HeyNay]





December 2, 2016

Sexy French Farmers Pose for Shirtless 2017 Calendar

Last year, the holiday season was set ablaze by France’s Pompiers Sans Frontières (Firefighters Without Borders) and their sizzling, stripped-down calendar. Shot for a good cause by renowned Paris-based fashion photographer Fred Goudon, the risqué calendar proved to be a popular Christmas gift—both in France and abroad. In keeping with tradition, Goudon has photographed a new crop of au naturel pin-up models for his 2018 edition: French farmers.

Read Article


December 1, 2016

Meticulous Landscape Paintings Beautifully Represent Intangible Emotional States

Artist Crystal Liu intimately ties her emotional states to beautiful abstract paintings. In large-scale works, she constructs landscapes that are metaphors for the intangible forces that drive us. Visually, elements of the Earth and sky are the actors for the feelings we cannot easily imagine. Together, the sun, mountains, and more depict “narratives of conflict, entrapment, longing, and precarious hope.” These symbols allow Liu to seem removed, yet make the pieces deeply personal.

Read Article


Get Our Weekly Newsletter