Pixelated Sculpture of a Girl Installed at a Train Station

Maya is a pixelated sculptural installation of a little girl at Platform 1 at the Bristol Temple Meads train station by University of West of England’s Senior Research Fellow Luke Jerram. The figure is modeled after the artist’s own daughter by the same name. Using the camera and software in an Xbox Kinect to capture and create his ambitious project, Jerram explores the modern world we’ve come to live in where our daily lives are constantly documented and shared digitally.

The sculptor says, “From the age of 3 my daughter Maya could use an iPhone. For her the technology was like a pencil, just another everyday tool to be used. Born into this world, for her, the digital revolution and the speed of technological development is not yet apparent.” As such, Jerram chose to create an image of his young daughter holding her phone to permanently greet (or haunt) commuters.

The three-dimensional portrait is an amalgam of 5,000 12mm square stickers applied to water jet cut aluminum sheets. At a distance, it can be hard to distinguish the sculpture from other children on the platform. Like a Monet, the sculpture appears to be quite clear from afar, but with proximity, the piece grows more abstract. The separate components and features of the structure are exposed, revealing a blocky construction.







Luke Jerram website
via [Pxlbyte]





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