Clever Combinations of Illustrations and Wood Carvings Create Extraordinary Miniature Cities

Luke O’Sullivan uses a combination of drawings and sculptural carvings to construct wondrous urban landscapes. His extensive metropolitan pieces strike a balance between recognizable architecture and impossible structures in order to create fantastical subterranean systems. The 3-D artworks protrude into space, similar to a diorama display, but O’Sullivan purposively ensures that his miniature worlds are rooted partially in reality and partially in the absurd.

His latest release, Cool Shelter makes use of screen printed drawings and wooden structures to create a labyrinth of twists and turns. His piece aims to explore the relationship between an over-world and underworld by blending together above and below with three-dimensional and two dimensional to create an exceptional environment. O’Sullivan states that he draws inspiration from dystopian science fiction and early Nintendo animations to conceive his artwork. With this in mind, his vibrant world explores the idea of an urban environment in a novel and interesting way.

Luke O’Sullivan: Website | Instagram
via [Booooooom]



January 20, 2017

Floating Cabin Lets Nature-Lovers Sleep in the Treetops of Sweden

If you’ve ever dreamed of cuddling up in a contemporary treehouse, the 7th Room Treehotel may be your new favorite getaway. Designed by Snøhetta—a design office that dabbles in landscaping, architecture, interiors, and brand design—the floating bungalow is tucked away in Northern Sweden and perfectly positioned for a sweeping view of the Northern Lights. The 7th Room is elevated by twelve 10-meter stilts and is beautifully built around the towering trunk of a pine tree.

Read Article


January 20, 2017

19 Most Creative Water Fountains From Around the World

Water fountains have a long place in our history. Dating back to the Ancient Roman times, these reservoirs were first designed with a purely practical purpose—for holding precious drinking water and bathing. These early fountains were uncovered, free standing, and placed along the street for public consumption. (Wealthier folks also had them in their homes.)

Read Article


Get Our Weekly Newsletter