Lying on a Giant Bubble

Last week, Alice told us about Argentinian artist Tomas Saraceno’s interactive installation called Cloud Cities. The display consists of twenty clear orbs of varying sizes being suspended at different heights. Within each orb is a different organic material like water or plant life.

New photos have emerged which show its real appeal – viewers can interact with all of the bubbles! Whether you choose to climb on top or go inside, there are ladders available to guide spectators to a globe of fun. Another neat feature is that every orb is connected. If someone shakes one orb, it causes the other spheres to react and shake. It’s a reflection of Saraceno’s statement about how all organic material and life affects one another.

If you’re in Berlin, you can climb into an orb yourself because Cloud Cities will be at the Hamburger Bahnof (Museum of Contemporary Art) until January 15, 2012.







Tomas Saraceno’s website
via [inhabitat]



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