Biologically Living Chandelier Formed Within Petri Dishes


Normally, you wouldn’t want to think about germs when you sit down to a meal, but design studio MADLAB brings bacteria right over the dining table with their Bacterioptica chandelier. The suspended light fixture is comprised of 15,000 feet of fiber optic cables connecting a variety of petri dishes. Its modular composition includes hundreds of metal rods, couplings, caps, and canisters, allowing its owner to construct a unique structure with an infinite number of combinations.

Bacterioptica is described as its own sort of living organism meant to reflect the various life forms that are significant to the family who proudly displays it. Light is filtered through the transparent discs filled with bacterial growth that the owner can install themselves. The design project’s statement reads: “It is alive in a very literal sense: it cultivates, distributes and illuminates the bacterial life of its family members by way of a branching assembly of metal rods, glass petri dishes and fiber optics.

Bacterioptica is adaptive by design, not only in its form and mechanics, but more importantly, in the way it evolves. Step by-step instructions guide the family through procedures to experiment with and prepare each bacterial sample for its place in the chandelier. Whether featuring bacteria from the skin, the yard or the dinner guests, Bacterioptica is continually changing in shape and luminosity.”






MADLAB website
via [thinx]



December 3, 2016

Artist Completes Gigantic Pen & Ink Drawing After 3.5 Years

From great pain often comes great artwork. Such is the case with Manabu Ikeda‘s monumental Rebirth, a 13′ x 10′ masterpiece that the artist toiled over for 3.5 years, working 10 hours a day. It’s Ikeda’s largest work to date and is the Japanese artist’s response to the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami that set off the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

Read Article


December 2, 2016

Sexy French Farmers Pose for Shirtless 2017 Calendar

Last year, the holiday season was set ablaze by France’s Pompiers Sans Frontières (Firefighters Without Borders) and their sizzling, stripped-down calendar. Shot for a good cause by renowned Paris-based fashion photographer Fred Goudon, the risqué calendar proved to be a popular Christmas gift—both in France and abroad. In keeping with tradition, Goudon has photographed a new crop of au naturel pin-up models for his 2017 edition: French farmers.

Read Article


Get Our Weekly Newsletter