Modern Architecture: Danish Pavilion by BIG (7 photos)

Along with UK’s Seed Cathedral, the Danish Pavilion by Bjarke Ingels Group is one of the standout pavilions at the 2010 Shanghai Expo. Visitors are welcome to ride around on one of the 1,500 bikes available at the entrance, a chance to experience the urban way of Denmark. It is a symbol of modern lifestyle and sustainable urban development. The building is designed as a double spiral with pedestrian and cycle lanes taking you from the ground and through curves up to a level of 40 feet (12 meters) and down again. After a nice little bike ride, visitors can chill out at the playground or picnic area. They can also check out the pool with fresh water from Copenhagen's harbor located at the center of the pavilion. A statue of the Little Mermaid can be seen in the middle of the pool, a symbol of Denmark which has been temporarily moved to China. "It is considerably more resource efficient moving the Little Mermaid to China, than moving 1.3 billion Chinese to Copenhagen,” says Bjarke Ingels.

Bjarke Ingels Group Photography by Iwan Baan, Hanne Hvattun, and Leif Orkelbog-Andresen via contemporist



January 17, 2017

Liberating Portraits of Ballerinas Elegantly Dancing in the Streets of Cairo

Like many dance photographers, Mohamed Taher has a knack for beautifully capturing the body in motion. His interest in movement is evident in his Ballerinas of Cairo series, and the captivating collection of photos also serves a more poignant purpose: it helps women fight sexual harassment and reclaim the city’s streets. After learning about the Ballerina Project, an ongoing series that documents dancers in urban settings across the globe, Taher was inspired to carry out a similar undertaking in the Egyptian capital.

Read Article


January 17, 2017

Rare Ruby Seadragon Is Spotted Alive for the First Time

While a ruby seadragon may sound like a mythical creature taken from the pages of a fairy tale, this incredibly rare animal was spotted in the deep waters of Western Australia for the first time. Recently, researchers from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the Western Australian Museum observed two ruby seadragons for 30 minutes using a mini remotely-operated vehicle.

Read Article


Get Our Weekly Newsletter