Modern Architecture: Dream Cube (9 pics + video)

ESI Design worked with the Shanghai Corporate Community to create the Dream Cube, a 43,000 square foot Corporate Pavilion for the 2010 World Expo. Made from recycled cd cases, the Dream Cube is covered in LED lights which change color when people are interacting inside the building.

Visitors are invited to participate online and in-person in a visual composition of the city's future by contributing thoughts and images of their city via the website. The words and photos of thousands of Shanghai residents will mingle throughout the pavilion to symbolize their co-creation of Shanghai's future.

In addition to using recycled materials and LED lights, the roof collects rainwater before filtering and storing it for daily use. The pavilion also features a solar thermal tube screen on the roof, which collects solar energy for producing hot water. After the Expo, the building materials will be recycled again for other applications.

Thanks Lauren, for the the tip!





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