Shredded Paper Strips Form Larger Landscapes


Tel Aviv-based artist Naama Arad shredded hundreds of Xerox copies to form these large, ribbon-like wall installations. Draping down from the ceiling and pooling on the ground, the strips merge together into collective images of gorgeous landscapes and monumental architecture that we might see online and in travel brochures. In a review by Sommer Contemporary Gallery, we learn that “[Arad’s] work proposes a fascinating point of view of emotions such as passion and the moment of falling in love with an Internet image, and the repetition of this moment into a work of art.”

Arad’s installations utilize recycled materials and simple construction techniques to create a more complex, blurred boundary between interior and exterior. The curtain-like structures cover large areas of the exhibition space, giving the illusion of a room that continues beyond the four constricting walls. While viewing the pieces, visitors may find themselves getting lost among the black and white outdoor scenes, an imaginary world extending beyond the interior of the gallery.






Naama Arad’s website
via [Sweet-Station]



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