National Geographic Photo Contest 2011


Every year, National Geographic holds a contest to celebrate the best photos of 2011. Although the deadline for submissions is coming up on November 30, Nat Geo allowed Alan Taylor to put the spotlight on some of the marvelous entries. In Focus is on the scene.

Above: “An unexpected side-effect of the 2010 flooding in parts of Sindh, Pakistan, was that millions of spiders climbed up into the trees to escape the rising flood waters; because of the scale of the flooding and the fact that the water took so long to recede, many trees became cocooned in spiders webs. People in the area had never seen this phenomenon before, but they also reported that there were less mosquitoes than they would have expected, given the amount of standing water that was left. Not being bitten by mosquitoes was one small blessing for people that had lost everything in the floods.” ( Russell Watkins)

National Geographic’s Best Photos of 2011 – in Focus





December 3, 2016

Artist Completes Gigantic Pen & Ink Drawing After 3.5 Years

From great pain often comes great artwork. Such is the case with Manabu Ikeda‘s monumental Rebirth, a 13′ x 10′ masterpiece that the artist toiled over for 3.5 years, working 10 hours a day. It’s Ikeda’s largest work to date and is the Japanese artist’s response to the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami that set off the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

Read Article


December 2, 2016

Sexy French Farmers Pose for Shirtless 2017 Calendar

Last year, the holiday season was set ablaze by France’s Pompiers Sans Frontières (Firefighters Without Borders) and their sizzling, stripped-down calendar. Shot for a good cause by renowned Paris-based fashion photographer Fred Goudon, the risqué calendar proved to be a popular Christmas gift—both in France and abroad. In keeping with tradition, Goudon has photographed a new crop of au naturel pin-up models for his 2017 edition: French farmers.

Read Article


Get Our Weekly Newsletter