Mesmerizing Photos of Unique Spiraling Staircases


German photographer Nils Eisfeld captures some truly unique spiraling staircases. The photographer’s Stairs series exhibits the winding paths of steps as they both ascend and descend, highlighting the mesmerizing beauty of the architectural constructs. The way most photographers have a visual sense of the human body, knowing the best angles of the human form, Eisfeld has honed his keen eye to capture the most compelling visuals of staircases.

Each image in Eisfeld’s vast portfolio transports the viewer on a visual journey. In some instances, one is drawn into a colorful, one-of-a-kind rabbit hole. Other times, the photographer’s surreal stairs resemble a myriad of things. Like a sky filled with fluffy clouds taking the shape of real-life objects, Eisfeld’s staircase photos offer mind-boggling silhouettes of a lightbulb, an eye, a broken egg, and a foot, not to mention banisters that resemble the ledger lines and bars in sheet music. Each architectural structure has its own shape and personality.

You can see way more of the Eisfeld’s beautiful photos of stairs on his Flickr.















Nils Eisfeld website
Nils Eisfeld on Flickr
via [farewell kingdom]





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