Spectrum of Colors Revealed Through Lit String Vibrations

British artist, physicist, and all-around science enthusiast Paul Friedlander produces kinetic light sculptures that provide a colorful feast for the eyes. Each piece in his body of work offers a visual medley of light and motion by rapidly rotating a piece of string through white light. The vibrating rope becomes invisible to the human eye, but colors from the light (which would normally be invisible to the naked eye) are revealed in rapid succession.

The scientific artist gives insight into the history of his career shift into the arts and explains the science in it all: “I decided to focus on kinetic art: a subject in which I could bring together my divided background and combine my knowledge of physics with my love of light. In 1983, at London’s ICA, I exhibited the first sculptures to use chromastrobic light, a discovery I had made the previous year. Chromastrobic light changes color faster than the eye can see, causing the appearance of rapidly moving forms to mutate in the most remarkable ways.”

Check out the video, below, to get an idea of this fantastic visual in motion.










Paul Friedlander website
via [My Amp Goes to 11]



January 19, 2017

Adorable Red Panda Cub Can’t Stop Hugging Toy That Looks Just Like Her

As if Maiya—a recovering red panda cub living at the Taronga Zoo in Sydney, Australia—wasn’t already completely adorable, the bright-eyed and bushy-tailed 2-month-old has recently been photographed with a cuddly new companion: a same-species stuffed animal. In November, Amala, a beloved red panda at the zoo, gave birth to Maiya. At first, the little one was happy and healthy. Not long ago, however, she was traumatically injured while being carried in her mother’s mouth.

Read Article



Get Our Weekly Newsletter