Holding the Cosmic Universe in His Arms


German-based photographer Phillip Schumacher has an extreme talent for creating enchanting, surreal scenes filled with creativity and imagination. His love for the universe is quite apparent in this series, entitled Cosmic Love. Each image is a mystical self-portrait in which he canoodles with tiny planets that are photoshopped into his arms. Schumacher says it’s as simple as this: “I just like the idea of transforming my room into space.”

A dark room, a starry sky, and a silhouetted figure are the backdrop to these bright, glowing planets. On his Flickr page, Schumacher insists that you view many of the photographs on a black background. It’s amazing how much more powerful each scene becomes when set against a dark infinite background of never-ending stars. A magical mood emanates from this work, as Schumacher reflects on the mystery of outer space and the world beyond our own planet.









Phillip Schumacher’s website





December 7, 2016

Mom Prepares Healthy Meals as Cartoon Characters for Son to Eat

Getting pint-sized, picky eaters to finish their fruits and vegetables can be a tricky task for many parents. For food artist Laleh Mohmedi, however, it’s a piece of cake. Using healthy ingredients and a bit of creativity, the Melbourne mom dishes out meals inspired by her 4-year-old son’s favorite animated characters. From expressive Pixar monsters to a spot-on Spongebob Squarepants, Mohmedi reproduces a range of beloved childhood icons out of meat, pasta, and other dinner staples.

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December 7, 2016

Beautiful Vintage Light Bulbs Feature Luminous Floral Filaments

LED light bulbs are all the rage nowadays, but you can’t beat the timeless beauty of vintage filaments. Between the late 1930s and into the 1970s, the Aerolux Light Corporation produced novelty bulbs with tiny sculptures inside. These decorative filaments take the shapes of flowers and birds which are electrically illuminated in a variety of vibrant colors. To construct these bulbs, Aerolux used low-pressure gas in their filaments—either neon, argon, or both.

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