Modern Wooden "Houses" Keep Objects Organized


If you’re like many other people who make a habit of misplacing their keys, Los Angeles-based creative agency Potluck has got just the solution for you. Co-founded by Eric Lai and Ko Nakatsu, the agency’s new brand of houseware products named Versir has launched a Kickstarter for their first line of products known as Houses for Objects. The distinct wooden “houses” in the available set of three include a watch display, key hook, and eyewear hanger that are altogether designed to keep people organized.

Nakatsu says, “Houses for Objects is a simple organizer that can help manage the things we use daily. The concept is about providing everyday objects with a place to live so that we can find them easier… We follow trends very closely with our creative agency and we feel the design of these Houses reflects our society's desire for modern friendly forms, intersecting with our longing for the warmth of natural materials and nostalgic colors."

Houses for Objects is currently seeking funding through their Kickstarter campaign, which ends on April 19th.





Houses for Objects on Kickstarter
Versir website
Potluck website





December 2, 2016

Upside Down Christmas Tree Hangs in the Halls of Tate Britain

  Every December, the Tate Britain debuts its much-anticipated Christmas tree. Designed by a different contemporary artist each year, the famed museum’s trees are both yuletide decorations and works of modern art. This year, Iranian installation artist Shirazeh Houshiary has quite literally turned the tradition on its head with her upside-down evergreen. Suspended by its trunk, the tree hovers above the main entrance’s stunning spiral staircase.

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December 2, 2016

Photographer Searches for Mystery Wedding Couple After Discovering Film in 50-Year-Old Camera

You never know what you’ll find when you buy something that’s vintage. When photographer Alex Galmeanu bought a rare 50-year-old camera off eBay, he never expected to find an exposed (but undeveloped) roll of film inside. “Of course I had it developed right away,” he wrote, “and, as a surprise again, I was able to recover 10 quite usable images, especially when considering their age.

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