3D Grass Printer Lets You Produce Creative Gardens in Any Shape You Want

In 2013, students at the University of Maribor in Slovenia designed a "green" 3D printer, known as PrintGREEN, whose output has the ability to grow grass. Conceived by Maja Petek, Tina Zidanek, Urka Skaza, Danica Renicnik and Simon Tran, they developed the device with the help of their mentor Duan Zidar. The innovative invention prints an earthy mixture in a variety of shapes and sizes, allowing you to express your gardening creativity with unconventional designs.

PrintGREEN, which is a specially-modified CNC machine, dispenses a combination of soil, seeds, and water, rather than plastic or metal. The mud holds its form and, over time, grass is able to grow from the organic, printed materials. There are a variety of uses for this type of machine, one of which is the application of single-surface compositions featuring lettering, artwork, and decorative patterns. In addition, PrintGREEN is capable of printing along the z-axis to produce bowls and other sculptural shapes. These objects don’t contain seeds in their structures–instead, they incorporate a top-layer of grass to grow like a potted planter.

PrintGREEN: Website | Facebook
via [Inhabitat]



January 20, 2017

Floating Cabin Lets Nature-Lovers Sleep in the Treetops of Sweden

If you’ve ever dreamed of cuddling up in a contemporary treehouse, the 7th Room Treehotel may be your new favorite getaway. Designed by Snøhetta—a design office that dabbles in landscaping, architecture, interiors, and brand design—the floating bungalow is tucked away in Northern Sweden and perfectly positioned for a sweeping view of the Northern Lights. The 7th Room is elevated by twelve 10-meter stilts and is beautifully built around the towering trunk of a pine tree.

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January 20, 2017

19 Most Creative Water Fountains From Around the World

Water fountains have a long place in our history. Dating back to the Ancient Roman times, these reservoirs were first designed with a purely practical purpose—for holding precious drinking water and bathing. These early fountains were uncovered, free standing, and placed along the street for public consumption. (Wealthier folks also had them in their homes.)

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