PVC Pipe Sculptures In Motion

Korean artist Duck-Bong Kang has created sculptures that look as though they are in motion by putting together multiple cuts of PVC pipe and then covering them in a thick shellac of urethane paint.

The figures in Kang’s sculptures are an exploration of human relationships and communication. According to Kang, holes ignite curiosity within people because, regardless of age or gender, one always wonders what is on the other side of them. He believes that we should be just as curious about what is on another person’s mind. In his opinion, the rise of social networks has decreased the amount of concrete personal conversation.

The holes also represent the void within ourselves that we helplessly try to fill. As he explains, “When we care too much about how we are seen through other people’s eyes rather than focusing on who we really are, we start to feel a sense of self-betrayal. The existential void may lead us to cry out, with the weight of depression caused by this in-authenticity.”

As you can see, Kang’s work may seem like pieces of PVC pipes put together, but there is much more deeper meaning behind it. To view his pieces in person, visit Seoul, Korea through December 23rd where these sculptures will be displayed at the Gallery 4Walls as a part of his solo show, Disguise.





Gallery 4walls Website
via [Colossal]





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